Welcome to
Cap Ras Ceràmica

Discover the unique beauty of each handmade piece

Meet Cap Ras Ceràmica

Llançà is a small Catalan fishing village on the northeast coast of Spain where the Pyrenees appear to tumble into the Mediterranean sea. Just north of Llançà lies Cap Ras, a wild and light drenched peninsula of rocky coves, beaches, and pine forests. Cap Ras Ceràmica is a response in clay to the colour and light of this otherworldly and spectacular location.

The handmade functional stoneware ceramic forms produced include bowls, mugs and tumblers that are covered in translucent glazes. The glaze colours reflect the sea, sand, rock, and trees of Cap Ras in a variety of combinations.

Ross Cranston is a self-taught Scottish ceramicist living and working in Llançà.

Meet Cap Ras Ceràmica

Llançà is a small Catalan fishing village on the northeast coast of Spain where the Pyrenees appear to tumble into the Mediterranean sea. Just north of Llançà lies Cap Ras, a wild and light drenched peninsula of rocky coves, beaches, and pine forests. Cap Ras Ceràmica is a response in clay to the colour and light of this otherworldly and spectacular location.

The handmade functional stoneware ceramic forms produced include bowls, mugs and tumblers that are covered in translucent glazes. The glaze colours reflect the sea, sand, rock, and trees of Cap Ras in a variety of combinations.

Ross Cranston is a self-taught Scottish ceramicist living and working in Llançà.

“Made with head, heart, and hand

Process

All products are hand made using a potter’s wheel and stoneware clay. The initial form is made and then, after drying to a ‘leather hard’ state, is trimmed to its final form. In the case of the mugs, this is when the handles are first hand-pulled and then attached.

After further drying to a ‘bone dry’ state the pieces are bisque fired to 950 degrees Celsius. Next, the ceramic is dipped in glaze and then undergoes a second and final glaze firing to 1222 degrees Celsius.

All products are hand made using a potter’s wheel and stoneware clay. The initial form is made and then, after drying to a ‘leather hard’ state, is trimmed to its final form. In the case of the mugs, this is when the handles are first hand-pulled and then attached.

After further drying to a ‘bone dry’ state the pieces are bisque fired to 950 degrees Celsius. Next, the ceramic is dipped in glaze and then undergoes a second and final glaze firing to 1222 degrees Celsius.